I’m just beaming with pride over this one:

The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum field is the place where the USC Trojans play football, two Summer Olympics were staged, John F. Kennedy accepted the Democratic presidential nomination and Pope John Paul II celebrated Mass.

 

It was also a location for “The Gangbang Girl #32,” a hard-core pornographic movie that featured 40 minutes of group sex on the gridiron turf, The Times has learned.

 

The filming at the taxpayer-owned stadium was done at night, with the Coliseum’s towering lights blazing and its rows of distinctive red and white seats framing many of the scenes. The video also shows the stadium’s signature tunnel, which the Trojan team charges through at the start of games, as well as a sliver of the iconic peristyle, the arched entrance to the Coliseum.

 

“I was just in awe that we were at the Coliseum,” said a star of the film, who goes by the name Mr. Marcus. “I’ve made movies for about 20 years and I’ve done a lot of things, but that one really stands out.… I mean, who gets to have sex on the Coliseum floor?”

 

Marcus said the football-themed footage was shot on a single night, including some non-explicit scenes filmed in a Coliseum locker room that did not make the final cut. The Coliseum is not identified by name in the video, which was made in 2001 and released in 2002. About half of the 90-minute movie was filmed elsewhere.

 

How the crew got permission to use the national historic landmark — which was built as a memorial to World War I veterans — is unclear. Attempts to reach a representative of the production company, Anabolic Video, were unsuccessful.

 

The Coliseum is jointly run by the city, county and state, which owns the land. A spokesman for the California attorney general’s office said Tuesday that he did not know if it is illegal to film pornography on state property. Agencies such as the California Department of Parks and Recreation prohibit porn shoots on properties they control.

 

Gaining access to the locked stadium and firing up the field lights typically requires the approval of a high-ranking manager, according to people familiar with Coliseum operations, who requested anonymity because they are not allowed to speak publicly on the matter.

 

An attorney for the top Coliseum executive at the time the video was made said his client knew nothing about the production.

 

Former General Manager Patrick Lynch resigned in early 2011 and was indicted in March of this year in a sweeping corruption case.